Candy is “godis” (pronounced “goodies”) in Swedish. Swedes love candy. At the supermarkets in Sweden, there are boxes of candy that the Swedes scoop from and fill their bags, which are weighed and priced by the kilo. There are also candy stores which are rather popular.

A Swede seeks godis.

CityKompaniet (CK) in Skellefteå.

Gummy candies are especially popular, more so than chocolate, in Sweden, and come in all different shapes. One can expect to find sour gummies, skull-shaped gummies, lizard-shaped gummies, frog-shaped gummies, crocodile-shaped gummies, and lizard-shaped gummies, to name a few.

Godis bins at ICA.

Godis bins at ICA.

All ages partake in the consumption of sweets, including candy. This may be the reason why most swedes are curvier then some of their European counterparts.

The godis section at a Swedish grocery store.

The godis section at a Swedish grocery store.

Swedish Fish?

Contrary to popular belief, Swedish fish are not available in Sweden. They are a popular American candy with a deceptive name! Swedish fish are manufactured by the Cadbury Adams Company in Ontario, Canada, and sold at many grocery stores and drugstores in the United States, as well as at Ikea. There is a variation on the “Swedish fish” which is available in Sweden, but it is not like the American version.